Skip to main content

About your Search

20091101
20091130
STATION
FOXNEWS 51
CSPAN 17
HLN 17
MSNBC 14
WHUT (Howard University Television) 10
WMPT (PBS) 9
CNN 8
WBAL (NBC) 7
WJLA (ABC) 7
WRC (NBC) 7
WETA 5
WMAR (ABC) 3
WUSA (CBS) 3
CSPAN2 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 162
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 162 (some duplicates have been removed)
. but tonight, the question will be what our esteemed analysts think about the future of the united states as we stand here at the end of 2009. we really have an extraordinary group of panelists. let me just share their introduction so everyone knows who they are. i have learned that people like introductions. certainly, i like it louise gives me that wonderful introduction. we will first hear from richard haas, counsel for relations, who has worked with two presidents. as council president, he has truly been an entrepreneurial leader. it has always been important, but richard has he brought many scholars and expertise and wide range of subjects. his most recent book is called a " war of necessity, war of joyce," -- "war of necessity, war of choice." glenn hubbard is no ordinary academic. he is dean of columbia business and a tenured professor of finance and economics at the columbia school of arts and sciences. he has worked for the treasury and as a consultant to the federal reserve bank, and recently he wrote a book called "healthy, wealthy, and wise -- five steps to better health care system
emigrating to the united states. it was a great magnet for talent for canada. i came and went to graduate school in the united states. ended up owing $500 to my law school and i had like a -year-old chevrolet and had a wonderful experience in this country. it is open in many ways, that are so unique to this country and to this culture and it was pacific northwestly clear to me why anybody with energy and talent would want to move here, because of the opportunities that were created not just in terms of economic opportunities but just in general. -- perfectly clear to me why anybody with energy and would want want to move here. it was much less -- there is much less prejudice in this society. merit and talent was a much more important quotient but have i to say that despite all of this experience that would have and has made me very optimistic on so many levels, i have developed an increasing sense of pessimism about where we are going in the future. future. . re ng in the future. the main reason for that, frankly, is the propensity of the american system now to produce weekly -- leadershi
of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
chief for "alternate." will also talk with a guest about the united states effort to resolve longstanding difference between israelis and palestinians. also note tim brown of the 9/11 network coalition. he will be here to talk was about the december 5 rally in new york against bernanke 9/11 suspects to a federal courthouse in lower manhattan. . . american icons, continues tonight at 8:00 p.m., with the history, art and architecture of the most symbolic structures, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disk set, $24.95. order on-line at c-span.org/store. now a look back at cuban missile crisis, with kennedy advisors ted sornson and carol kasem. from the kennedy library in boston, this is an hour and 15 minutes. this war policy was done in secret and steps were taken to deceive us by every means they could. they were planning in november to open to the world the fact that they had these missiles so close to the united states, not that they are with intending to fire them, because if they were going to get into a niewg clear struggle, th
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
and shakers of the united states of america. that is why i am here. that is why i am doing this luncheon. i feel like -- the gratitude is out of this world right now for having me do this. it really quick, i want to thank everybody for this honor. i want to thank you for inviting me to speak. the recorders of the industry and all of the change agents, you, the press, has a very special responsibility, and that is to be a mirror for us to see ourselves, our community, our country, and the rest of the world, and a truly respect the rule that you play in our system. i am sure that many of you are asking why would i want to speak at the national press club in washington, d.c., and why would they invite me? i make my living by stringing together verses or playing a part in some movie or television series that you may all have seen, "law and order," by the way. what would ludacris have to say? what would i have to say about leadership? i am going to say a lot of different things, so take what i say a word for word. you wonder if i plan to run for office, maybe for president in 2012. you do not ha
that this is not an unending responsibility of the united states without limit. senator lugar pointed out the issue of cost. you know, we have over eight years in iraq and afghanistan under the bush administration not paid for any of those military operations. now that is coming home to reckon in terms of the huge deficit. we have to move forward and support this operation responsibly. but the president -- i think the key to the president's response is laying down a strategy, informing the american public of what's at stake, and i think that when they listen and when they hear, they will be supportive, but it will be a support that has to be continually developed and strengthened going forward. >> you've both mentioned the cost. let me ask you, we're going to talk to chairman david obey of the house proportions committee later in the program. he wants a special war surtax, wants it laid out, so the american people know, here's what's going to pay for iraq and afghanistan. senator reed, to you first, do you support that? do you think it should be broken out separately so the american people get a separate b
that was licensed in the united states. we have done those things. we have shifted all the vaccine manufacturing to the extent we can to multi those virus first because there faster to fill, with leaving the rest of leftover for the single dose syringes. we have worked with them to shift everything they can do to get the vaccine out as fast as they possibly can. then we are tracking through the process step by step. to the degree that when a lot is ready to be released at a manufacturer, we have a truck waiting. it pulls up at the loading dock ready to accept that vaccine and bring it to the distribution sites. if we have been working through this every step of the process to get any delays out. that is what a sight visits have largely been about. >> a question about the contracts. [unintelligible] to produce this reject all under 51 million doses, kabbalah contracted the manufacturers to fill 117 million doses. why aren't they able to undo the full amount of doses -- able to do the full amount of doses? >> we need to make sure we have enough vaccine derived the time people want it and being ca
to you first, what is the single biggest challenge for the president of the united states when he speaks to the united states, ed rollins? >> how long we're going to be there and equally as important what is the mission and how is the mission different than it was two years ago or four years ago. dechl democrats have to be convinced the president's party is very divided on this issue. i think he'll have the republican support he needs, but at the end of day, if this is not a bipartisan effort long-term they won't get the resources and funding to make it work. >> donna brazile, to ed rollins' point, the toughest sales job is the anti-war left of the democratic party. how does the president convince them to support him or keep quiet of the criticism? >> public support of the war has diminished across the board not just with the left, across the country and even across the world where we depend on troops from other countries to help us in afghanistan. the president gave a very thorough speech back in march, laying out our objectives. he said it was to dismantle, disrupt and destroy al qaeda
telling the president of the united states no, i don't even want olympia snowe, i'd want one republican supporting health care bill? >> the truth is -- i'm going to disagree right now. free enterprise does not work particularly well in health care and i will tell you why. the administration rate -- >> we don't have insurance companies competing across state lines 3 >> that's the worst thing you could do. >> are you kidding me? >> yes. i will explain why this is. in my state, everybody under 18 has health care. you cannot be refused by any insurance company, no matter what the reason is. everybody gets charged the same. you cannot charge a sick patient who is older more than 20% more than you can charge a young, healthy patient. that has been going on for 15 years. if you could let people buy insurance across state lines, you are making the texas health commissioner be my health commissioner. do you know what the insurance rate is in in texas? 25%. 22% of children have no health insurance in texas. i do not want health commissioner in texas to have anything to do with my health insurance
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
is it when a united states citizen is declared disabled they have to wait time before they can get medicaid or medicare? host: 8 collar like that, better worse off? -- a caller like that. . guest: there are obviously community health clinics and other medical facilities that provide medical care cheaply or, in the cases of need, for free. i'm not minimizing the collar's husband's typical. i am sure -- caller's husband's difficulty. but there is health care available in the country for people who cannot afford to pay. ad. caller: good morning, michigan. host: michigan. i'm sorry. caller: i just wanted to say the last time i checked, unemployment was 19.5%, and my husband, who just had his 29th anniversary at the company he worked at has been laid off and is losing his mind. i would be crying if i thought it would do any good, but it will not. he is doing everything he can to find a job. as soon as he sees something in the newspaper, he goes there. he is so talented, he can fix anything, but he is 65 years old, too, and that is a problem. a few weeks ago, senator lugar? he was on "newsmakers"
, the president should be aware the jobs people are worried about in the united states are getting people back to work. we have 15 million people out of work. our priorities are skewed here. we have things to take care of her at home. why are we worrying about afghanistan? it really raises questions about the extent of the pentagon's influence on the administration. >> why do you think the president is doing it? many people thought the president came from the same side of the tracks that you're on, generally speaking, in terms of the limits of u.s. power in the world and the need to rejoin the world community and not to be hawkish. what do you make of his decision? why do you think he moved that direction? >> well, i think it's going to be a tough one to defend. and you're right about the -- we've seen the limits of u.s. coercion, and this government in afghanistan is a corrupt government. everyone knows that. sooner or later, the kind of consensus government which afghanistan has had historically is going to have to be reinstituted so people in afghanistan will have control over their own des
hnology is more important than ever in driving the united states economy and also 33 percent saying united states will be the global tech leader and a lot of americans think we will not. why is that? >> there's good reason to be concerned. it's not so much that america's innovation pro west is lagging but that the rest of the world is catching us. the recession has not helped with unemployment at ten percent we have good minds not contributing to the economy and we've seen anybody incorporate america has seen a lot of projects and r and d spending cut back as companies try to trim costs as their top line as shrunk so the survey captures the notion that both in the long-term and short-term there's things to be concerned about. > the first paragraph of the story says by most measures, america remains the world leader in technology achievement. consider the 2009 nobel prize winners of the 13 people honored nine were america's. not bad, right? >> but the nobel is a lagging indicator that people earn that typically at the end of their career for work that took place in many cases years and years pri
of the united states. finally, i just think it's important to point out someone who remembers working in the white house before the state dinner would happen, it's the entire building is a buzz and it's really a way of sort of literally rolling out the red carpet of the united states to another member of the world community and it's such an important symbolic act. it can't be overstated to show that the united states wants to engage the rest of the world and show the united states respects cultures from around the world and let's not forget the president won by asian americans by a large margin so an important symbol here at home to that community. >> danny, as we wait to see the president and prime minister step out, we know they are behind closed doors and part of the conversation is certainly afghanistan and pakistan. you've got vice president dick cheney coming out critical of the administration saying it was dithering but what about making india a key player in whatever happens in afghanistan regarding the strategy? >> i would have to agree. i think our relationship with india wi
be a good idea to admit the deposed and ailing shah of iran, to the united states for medical treatment. well, two weeks later we found ourselves in the embassy behind a steel door on the second floor of the old chancellor ri, the dearly-beloved henderson high that some of you may remember. and on the other side banging on the, banging on the door were this group of unhappy, unhappy iranians. well, it befell to me to -- having made one of probably the worst decisions of my foreign service career -- to go out from that door, to go out from behind the door and attempt, and i use this word with some trepidation, to negotiate with this, with this crowd to see if there was something we could do. maybe we could get them out or at least delay them because what was very clear to us already was that there was, we were on our own. that if anything was going to be done, we had to do it. we had made calls to the iranian government at the time or at least what passed for the iranian government, something called the provisional government of iran. and it was very clear from that contact that there wa
for afghanistan. >> the united states cannot be engaged in an open-ended commitment. >> his attorney general prosecutes the plot's masterm d mastermind. >> in a courthouse just blocks away from where the twin towers once stood. >> this is a big step in the wrong direction. >>> topics this morning for our headliners. secretary of state hillary clinton and former new york mayor, rudy giuliani. hillary and rudy only on "this week." >>> then -- >> we don't have to continue to go down this controversy road. >> she's back. >>> george will, gwen ifill of pbs. david brooks of "the new york "mother jones." corn from >>> and as always, the sunday funnies. >> before john mccain chose her as his running mate, his campaign spent $50,000 on a background check. when he heard this, john mccain said we should have spent $75,000. >>> and we begin today with the secretary of state hillary clinton. thanks for spending time with us this morning. >> it's a pleasure to talk with you from singapore, george. >> wel and as you're in singapore, you and the president are facing really his toughest decision yet on afg
celebrate the great and growing partnership between the united states and india. as we all know in india some of life's most precious moments are often celebrated under the cover of a beautiful tent. it's a little like tonight, we have incredible food and music and are surrounded by great friends. for it's been said that the most beautiful things in the universe are the starry heavens above us and the feeling of duty within us. mr. prime minister, today we work to fulfill our duty, bring our countries closer together than ever before. tonight under the stars we celebrate the spirit that will sustain our partnership, the bonds of friendship between our people. it's a bond that includes more than 2 million indian-americans who enrich every corner of our great nation. leaders in government, science, industry and the arts, some of whom join us tonight and the bond of friendship between a president and prime minister who are bound by the same unshakable spirit of possibility in brotherhood that transforms both our nations, the spirit that gave rise to movements led by giants like gandhi and k
in the united states, significant announcent? >> yes, defitely. there had been a thoht that the president woulrefrain from putting anything psk on the table until the congre had acted. the house has acted if these numbers are in lin with what the hous has in their bill,ut the senate has just reportedded somethg out of comttee. nothing s reach the floor. so by putting h force behin these numbers, the presint is sort of settingp a negotiating line witthe congress and indicating probably what he feels is the minimu benth whenhesenate shouldn't go and a minimum of wt the world neez needs. a warming of three to four degreesahrenheit puts us in the nger zone as far as global warming is concerned, and these sorts of emissions reductions are consistentwith what we need to get od start combatting th warming. >> suarez: professor, ishat mething new for the united stes, specific ars and specific reduction perntages? >> back in the cnton administration, the u.s. did agree to specifiyears and specic reduction perntages, and they were emdied in the kyoto protocol whh president inton never sent up to t
security in the united states. foreign policy is that a zero. these men need to be protected. we may not want to have war, but this has never been declared a war. my ex-husband was a silver star in the marine corps. my fiancee was a captain in the navy. we are allowing this country to look like fools. it has got to stop. military men are trying their best, they need to be protected, we need more troops, and every time there is a news report saying that we are going to make a decision, he is taking too long to make this decision. host: we will have to leave it there. thank you, diane. front page of "the washington post" talks about what is leading up to the speech. "9000 marines beginning final preparations to deploy in southern afghanistan. the marines will be followed by 1000 u.s. army trainers to train the afghan army and police force. the new forces will not start moving until the president lines of both strategies at west point on tuesday. the editors of "the washington post weigh in this morning -- washington post" way in this morning. "if he is going forward to stabilize the co
helped the hijackers reach the united states, then sent them $120 thousand dollars for expenses and flight training. the suspects have been held for as long as 5 years-- at secret sites and at guantanamo-- and have been subjected to harsh interrogations. khalid sheikh mohammed was reportedly water-boarded 183 times in 2003 before the practice was banned. but at today's news conference, attorney general holder said he was sure of convictions. >> the reality is-- and i want to be as assuring as i can-- that, based on all of my experience and based on all of the recommendations and the great work and the research that has been done, that i am quite confident that the outcomes in these cases will be successful ones. >> reporter: and in japan, president obama said he believes the u.s. federal courts are up to the job. >> i am absolutely convinced that khalid sheik mohammad will be subject to the most exacting demands of justice. the american people will insist on it and my administration will insist on it. >> reporter: the idea of bringing the detainees to the u.s. has already run in
you. >> it is and gentlemen, welcome to the chamber of commerce of the united states of america. my name is ron summers of the u.s.-india business council. for 34 years we have strived to advance u.s.-india commercial ties. today, what a historic event we have before us. more than ever, the business communities of both our countries are needed to provide an impetus to this important relationship. ladies and gentleman, please stand with me and help me welcome the individuals who are making this possible -- tom donahue, into a newly, ambassador chancre, and the hon. prime minister of india, dr. manmohan singh. [applause] >> thank you very much. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. prime minister singh, ambassadors, distinguished guests, welcome to the united states chamber of commerce. mr. prime minister, we are delighted to be hosting you and your delegation today. we are certain you will have a productive visit to the united states. you are among friends. joining us today are some of the foremost business leaders in america and india. we extend a special welcome to the chair of the
full circle to what we're doing here today in this important g-8 in the capital of the united states. i feel that a failure to articulate a meaningful, a global jewish identity is the biggest threat currently facing the jewish people. [applause] i want to see our people united, joined by global destiny and mission. a small people, but one that is influential and critical to civilization. we are all here today because ugc, the jewish federations of north america, had created a remarkable network with another organization where we can have communications about identity globally and envision tomorrow and create a stronger jewish future. when we do we can deal with the gall stones -- lies and forgeries. i think in this city they are fond of the expression "yes, we can," but this will take board. do not let this be simply a place for schmooze and catch up with friends and colleagues. we have a larger agenda to address. we must be a think tank to create a vision of jewish people for this century. we're here to create a division. who could have imagined that the jew would one day run at one of
east and the united states did not arm israel in their wars, we never would have suffered 9/11. i do nothing anyone would have heard the name osama bin laden. we are going to be there for years and years. they talk about raising taxes on the ridge to pay for this war. they will be paying for it forever. thank you. host: the first official state dinner will be taking place in washington, "obama was big tent leaves out gop big wigs -- obama's big tent believes that gop big wigs. chief among for those not coming, john maynard -- john boehner and eric cantor. the president did not invite john mccain, even though mr. obama pledged a post-partisan presidency. -- presidency." we will have live coverage of the dinner giving way under -- getting way tonight at 9:00. there is also a press conference that will happen at 11:30 eastern time. the arrival ceremony was originally scheduled for the south lawn, it will be moving to the east room. lester, good morning from detroit. caller: good morning. listen, i do not have any problem with the rich being taxed for this war. over the years, you know,
. those are things that are are unpopular. and he's a president of the united states being told by the military, mr. president, we can't defend those outposts and we need more people to do a countersurge insurgency. and i guess it these are correct and they puts 43,000 troops in, imagine the progressiveness, with the troops, if you don't advance health care. i think he'll find 10,000 and train the army because he's politically unsustainable with his base, if he puts in 43,000 troops and prosecutes afghanistan during a water with afghanistan as president, i think he'll have a democrat primary and that we'll have a substantial split mountain democrat party, if that's what he does. and i would argue this -- for our party, and the tensions between our kind of economic votes and our religious conservatives, the fact that the energy in republican party is about spending and deficit, if we're so inept we can't take these people and make them part of a new coalition, they we oughting to nothinged. the -- this are 24% of the people in this country who say they would likely vote for a thi
interference, if you will. >> reporter: unemployment in the united states is now more than 10%. the highest level since 1983. if you were president, what would you do about unemployment? >> i'd start cutting taxes and allowing our small businesses to keep more of what their earning, more of what they are producing, what they own and earn so they can start reinvesting in their businesses and expand and hire more people. not punishing them by forcing health care reform down their throats, by forcing an energy policy down their throats that ultimately will tax them more, and cost them more to stayn business. those are back asspa asswards w dealing with the economy. >> reporter: you have a way with words. you said to charlie gibson that there are places in alaska that you can see russia. do you feel that alaska's proximity to russia from whatever place you can see it, is significant foreign policy experience? >> it's very significant, and we are a gate keeper for the continent. so, for national security reasons and for energy independence and resource development reasons, alaska should be recog
of the united states of america to have that decision made and made as soon as possible. >> still, general david petraeus, the head of central command, says the month-long process has been productive and is almost over. >> there have been explanations and discussions about how the civilian component of this will complement what is done by the work of our military troops. >> by all accounts, afghanistan's government is the weak link in the four strategies the president is now focusing on. >> in the couner is insurgency strategy, the war relies on the eth cassie of the host nation partners, the afghan national police and the government itself. >> the inability to count on some regional governors as partners or to predict a time line for the national government to train enough reliable security forces suggests to some experts a hybrid strategy. >> it's not focused on a counterinsurgency across the entire country but a counterinsurgency in a few key areas, the most violent areas. >> sensible strategy is counterinsurgency involving pakistan as well and the obama administration has set up benchmarks f
have just seized an office building in the united states. the connection? iran. plus, charges against the for the hood suspect. i'm shepard smith, and this is fox news. >> number one issue, i think, right now is that major hasan be brought to justice. >> 13 counts of murder. one for each person major hasan is accused of killing during the army post rampage. what to expect in military court. did the suspect send cash to militants? tonight, federal agents follow the money trail. first, from fox journalists tonight, he is accused of killing 13 people during a shooting spree at fort hood in texas. now u.s. military prosecutors are charging dr. army major nidal hasan with 13 counts of premeditated murder. crimes that carry the maximum penalty of death. and today military investigators say more allegations are possible as they try to reconstruct exactly what happened during the chaotic moments of the attack one week ago. >> the crime scene involves a very large area to include the inside of the soldier ready medical center. the center includes offices, cubicals and open areas where
% below 2005 levels as the target. host:: ñ were other countries waiting to hear from the united states? guest: absolutely, turn it came out the day after. they had been clearly waiting. -- china came out the day after. they had been clearly waiting. host: what are the5 sticking points in the negotiation? guest: there are two things. what is the target that was set last week. the other is the financing. there was an agreement with developing companies that would take actions in return for financing from the wealthier nations. we have taken care of the target. we have stepped up with the target and now we need to step up on the financing side. host: it was stated last week, president obama has set goals to reduce emissions and you were quoted as saying that the president is walking a nice edge. can you expand on that? guest: he is in a very narrow space. on the one hand, he had to take a stand that would encourage india and china that we would, in fact, take a stand. and he also led to do it in a way that would not hurt his chances with congress. for 12 years, congress has been asking fo
that whenever its firepower, the united states is impatient and will eventually go away. a visit to afghanistan reveals both sides of this complicated and ambitious strategy." we want to be more of your reaction to this story about king abdullah -- to this story about the withdrawal of abdullah abdullah. caller: this is a way for obama to disentangle himself from afghanistan under the pretense that we cannot further sacrifice troops in support of a government that is obviously corrupt. thank you. host: the secretary of state had the only response yesterday. israel put forth what the secretary called unprecedented concessions. netanyahu offered them in an effort to restart peace talks, a departure of the administration's earlier criticism of israel. meanwhile, the story this morning is inside a "the new york times." -- inside of "the new york times." "the secretary of state failed on saturday to slow down and not stopped the jewish construction of settlements on the west end. edward, good morning. caller: we need to enhance our relationships with all people. i think that obama should stand up an
conversation, even though rick's not here, you can still call us, in the united states the number is 1-877-742-5751. >>> hey, rick, this is taylor, 35,000 more troops to afghanistan? no, we need to deploy them here and bring the troops over there here and take back our inner cities, fight the gangs, the crimes in our inner cities here, take care of home. >>> got a couple of big stories out of the white house today. it now turns out that the president is planning to make a personal appearance as a global climate change summit in copenhagen next month. and here's the real news t white house says that he is prepared to offer reduction of 17% in america's greenhouse gas emission, 17% below 2005 levels. that has potentially big ramifications, particularly for the cost of energy and the cost of doing business. but what's more important, your wallet or the earth? we'll be keeping an eye on that. >>> the other big story, afghanistan, the president's big announcement on troop re-enforcements is now set for tuesday evening, 8:00 p.m. eastern, from the campus of the united states military academy
? >> i think there is a list, a long list, of countries over a period of time that the united states and the president will host as visitors and guest here, but i think what came about with this one, this is 810-year relationship -- 810-year relationship. over 10 years, there has really been an important partnership in reaching out on the part of president clinton, on the part of president bush, to really solidified this important strategic relationship. there is so much -- this is the largest democracy in the world, india is. we are the second-largest democracy. there is an important relationship that needs to be nurtured and continue. the national security advisers of the president -- have said that he should which it will recommend others that he should host. and ultimately, that will be his decision. >> we heard earlier that this is the first lady's show. when does the first lady's office began preparing for a state dinner? >> this dinner, likely, or this visit started right at the time that secretary clinton hand- deliver the invitation from president obama to prime minister sin
, matthew hoh says he has lost understanding of and confidence in the strategic purpose of the united states presence in afghanistan. "is not how ware fighting the war, but why." evan, what you make of that resignation? >> it is disturbing. the state department is not a player out there. i don't know what his circumstances, but they need every state department person taking get out there. the military is running the show, and that is an imbalance. counterinsurgency is as much a civilian, the state department, nation-building thing as it is a military thing, and the military is doing all of it. >> jonathan, anything you on when the president will come to a decision? -- anything new on when the president will come to a decision? >> he is meeting with his advisers on friday. what you are sharing increasingly is mcchrystal lite, which is that he will probably answer more troops into afghanistan, but probably not the 40,000 mcchrystal wants to see. >> charles? >> we are having these debates about the matter of the strategy. at the heart of this is an issue that david brooks raced in the friday "n
different thing. >> strategic question for the united states, which is, which is more important, the country with all of the oil, the country that was developing nuclear weapons or the country that just happened to host the senior leadership of al-qaeda on the day that 9/11 occurred? it seem as though we're putting a lot of effort into a place in the broader scheme of things shouldn't matter very much. >> the administration will say afghanistan doesn't matter but for the fact that it is next to pakistan, a country with nuclear weapons. it will have repercussions in a place you don't want repercussions. >> and money down the road, when they -- if we need to have them create their own security forces and their own sort of personal area of responsibility, we don't know whether they're going to have money to do that. they don't have economy to do that. doesn't look like there is a way for that to come. >> all right. guys, next we'll look at 2010 defense spending. you're watching this week in defense news. (voice 1) we've detected an anomaly... (voice 2) how bad is it? (voice 1) traffic's off the
got an award from the president of the united states. this time the dalai lama came to washington and president obama wouldn't meet with him because he didn't wa to offend the chinese government which has major disputes. he did not want to offend them on the eve of his trip. that i think is a theme you're going to see playing out over the next few days. tavis: first asia. now jump to afghanistan. i'll come back to the troop issue in just a second. first, president karzai set to be sworn in for a second term on thursday. we all know the turmoil around the elections. t oeride of his inauguration for the second term on thursday, what position are we now in dealing with him leading this country? >> he is an extremely imperfect character. that said, i'm not cvinced that theer players that we had hoped would have won or been more competitive would have been that much better. karzai is not our solution in iraq. -- in afghanistan, sry. our pato potentia success in afghanistan is going to be to improve the quality of the situation. if we do that, it will draw local afghanis out to particip
the united states would have to withdraw. if there's a surge, there is probably going to be more killed , and how much longer do you think the u.s. public can tolerate this? >> i would never want to make that kind of a prediction based on deaths. each one of those deaths is significant. and i would never make a prediction like that. the president is making a critically important decision for the security of this country. he has taken the needed time to do it. he, i'm sure, is under a great deal of pressure from the republicans just every week it seems are attacking him for taking this time. and if he does something less than what they think general mcchrystal is asking for, they would be critical of him i think, again, unless it is part of a larger nato decision where it seems to me that the decision of the president would be seen in that larger context and would be more difficult to attack the way i think some republicans at least are geared up to attack and have already said that unless the president goes with 40,000 combat forces that he's somehow or another is not doing what mcchrys
th inrgents there and vry portantly ome plausible scenario f how the unite states ends thist some point and gets t because he's got a liberal base that is very woied about that. peteis there soe worry tt this i i, that if this increase doesn do it, n more? >> i think forsome liberals there woul't even be this increase. t yes there's going o have o be some tpe of god effct and it's going tobe very hard for him to gbeyond this. there are thousands onato troops tere as well so this ll be a fairly lrge bildup t again the presint, he's going have to talk abt how this is oing to be effective in dismantng al qaeda ad fighting the isurgents atthe same time havi aplausible scenario for how it ends esident pete: wesaw this week apretty good xample of hw tough sell itill be the the esident laid outwhy he thiks it's important tostay in afghistan to go after errorists in thetribal aras but soe saidle onl way to prove it is if there are taxes rsed to pa pour it. >> to mke sure al qaeda an its extremit alliescannot operate effecvely in those areas. we're oing to ismantm and degre their capaliti
from michigan points out, we do have another document here and that is the united states constitution and i think the most dramatic contrast is when you take speaker pelosi's approach to health care, 20 pounds by the way and i have carried this around to know it is about 20 pounds of paper and you take the u.s. constitution and contrast it to this massive document of 1,990 pages and this is the founding document of our country. we don't need a government takeover of health care, we need to fix the problems that are broke. we don't need to break the things that are great in this country. we need to continue this debate and encourage the american people to stay engaged because the american people want the problems fixed, but they don't want the government that couldn't even run a cash for clunkers program properly to be taking over their health care and interfere in their relationship with their doctor. . mr. broun: frankly if you look at that document, the small one you just dropped down, the constitution of the united states, you won't find any constitutional authority in that documen
justice of the night of the of the united states. >> something different is going on here. you need to appreciate how important it is. >> this is the highest court in the land. the framers created it after studying a great lawmaker in history. >> one of these cases was very close. close. you cannot go here to make the law to decide who wants to win. we decide who wins under the law. >> who will be surprised by the high-level? >> why do we have a beautiful structure? it is to remind us that we have an important country. it is to remind the public of the important and centrality of the law. >> it amazes me and gives me faith in our country to know how much people trust the courts. >> i think the danger is sometimes the building things it is all about you. that is something that i do not think it works well. >> home to america's highest court. the role is to interpret the constitution of the united states. outside, almost daily expressions of protest are made by those of listing the courts except their case or role in their favor. there are private rooms seen by those that are there. i
of thousands of combat troops from the united states that are going to be directly involved in taking on insurgents in this growing taliban. this could be kind of a murky mission, if you will. that's what people are afraid of. senior administration officials i talked to say, look, they understand the president has to make it very clear what the mission is and that in fact the afghanistan government has a commitment on its side and there's going to be an exit strategy here. they are not going to be tied down in something unending. >> as the president gets ready to address the nation tomorrow night, what do we expect the president to say. >> reporter: there are going to be some things that are very clear. first of all, we're talking somewhere in the rarng of 35,000 additional forces that the president is going to call for. this is going to be a total of 100,000 or so on the ground in afghanistan. the cost they are talking about $75 billion a year for this war effort. but they are going to say that, look, nato allies are contributing 5,000 forces or so. clear expectations from the afghan
to uphold the constitution of the united states and obey the orders of the united states and the officers of the marines. so i think that is pretty clear. >> we had a question in the back over here. >> [unintelligible] >> i would like to get a question from a nonmember of the press. >> [unintelligible] we are increasingly fighting with allied forces in different venues around the world. yet we're the only country with the exception of the u.k. that does not have eccentric warfare. what are we doing, should we do to get more procurements overseas to build up their network-centric capabilities so that we do not have to do all the war fighting? >> i want to correct a term that i never felt was accurate. warfare is not network-centric. it is commander-centric. that commander is enabled by networks. this is a hugely important concept if you approach it that way. in fact, when i came home from iraq the second time and went out to fort leavenworth, which is also in charge of air combat training centers and the simulation centers and also do the high level exercises, we did some major overhauls.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 162 (some duplicates have been removed)